Diluvio” is part of Carleton University’s Cinquecento: Carleton Celebrates Leonardo da Vinci, a year-long celebration honouring the renaissance genius on the 500th anniversary of his death in France on May 2, 1519.

The installation is inspired by Leonardo’s reflections on the inter-connections within all of Nature as revealed by his studies of the flow of water, air, light, shadows, energy, and his evocative “deluge drawings.” The installation is the recent work by students in the Crossings Interdisciplinary Workshop, offered by Professor Manuel Báez in the Fall term of 2018 at the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism. By working with aluminum mesh that’s been folded into a very fluidly malleable pattern, students were encouraged to experientially explore and improvise through these dynamic shape-shifting properties and their projected shadows while drawing inspiration from Leonardo’s speculations and studies.  

Crossings Interdisciplinary Workshop Diluvio student teams:  

  • Hamid Aghashahi  & Guillermo Bourget Morales
  • Abigail Maguire & Edyta Suska 
  • Connor Tamborro & Jasmine Sykes 
  • Nikolina Braovac & Asmi Sharma                                                        
  • Petros Kapetanakis & Hadi Siddiqui 
  • Daniel Baldassarri & Liam Yeaman
  • Shaylyn Kelly & Walter Fu
  • Kaleigh Jeffrey & Stephen Scanlan
  • Sepideh Rajabzadeh & Runjia Li
  • Dylan Rutledge & Tianlang Feng

Special thanks to Sami Karimi for his contribution to the Diluvio installation.

Leonardo saw nature as weaving an infinite variety of elusive patterns on the basic warp and woof of mathematical perfection.  Nowhere could nature’s endless variations on geometrical themes be seen more marvellously than in the dynamics of water, above all in the configurations of vortices.”          
Martin Kemp, Leonardo da Vinci: The Marvellous Works of Nature and Man, 2006