Library News

October 29, 2019

From November 15, 2019 to December 15, 2019 you will not be able to place a hold on items that are out on loan to other patrons.

However, any holds placed before November 15 will remain in effect and will be delivered in the regular time frame.

If a book or item you need is out on loan, we recommend requesting a copy through interlibrary loans.

This temporary service outage is required as part of the work being done this semester to implement Omni, our new library system.

If you need help finding what you are looking for, ask us!


October 29, 2019

Omni launch delayed

As was previously announced, we will be launching Omni, our new library search tool, on January 8th, 2020.

This post provides links with more details on the changes to expect.


What is changing

Summon and the Library Catalogue

Both Summon and the Library Catalogue will be replaced by our new library search interface, Omni.

With Omni you will be able to search all of Carleton's print and electronic resources, using facets or the advanced search features to find exactly what you are looking for. Omni also makes it easy to find peer-reviewed articles and uses enhanced tools like virtual shelf browsing and citation tracing to help you discover books and articles related to your search topic.

The interface and features available in Omni are very similar to those currently available in Summon.

Saved searches, saved records, and reading history (Library Catalogue)

Any searches, records, lists, or reading history that you have saved in the Library Catalogue will not be migrated to Omni.

We recommend that you export any data that you would like to save before December 10, 2019.

Click here for instructions on how to export this data.

 

Once Omni launches, links to Summon will no longer work.

These links will need to be manually updated once Omni launches to use the equivalent permalink in Omni.

Links to Summon have URLs that begin with https://carletonu.summon.serialssolutions.com...

Here is an example of what a link to a book in Summon currently looks like: Creating Carleton: the shaping of a university on Summon

Once Omni launches, link to materials in the Library Catalogue will be automatically redirected to the equivalent record in Omni.

Links to materials in Library Catalogue have URLs that begin like this:  https://catalogue.library.carleton.ca/record=...

Here is an example of what a link to the same book in the Library Catalogue currently looks like: Creating Carleton: the shaping of a university in the Library Catalogue.

Note that other links to the Library Catalogue (to saves searches, specific search scopes, etc) will not necessarily be redirected and should be updated manually once Omni launches.

eJournals

The current eJournals search and browse tool will be replaced with a similar search tool in Omni.

However, the new tool will be more comprehensive, including both ejournals and print journals.

What is not changing

Direct links to e-resources

Direct links to e-resources are not affected by this upgrade and will continue to work normally.

This means that if you are linking directly to an ebook, ejournal, article, or database and the link does not go to Summon or the Library Catalogue, that link will continue to work. No action is required.

Here is an example of the a link to the same book from above on the ProQuest Ebook Central platform looks like: Creating Carleton: the shaping of a university.

Databases

The current Databases search and browse tool is not affected by this upgrade, and continue to work normally.

Course Reserves and Ares

You will still be able to use Omni to search for materials that have been placed on reserve.

Ares is not affected by this upgrade and will continue to work normally.

Interlibrary Loans and Racer

Racer (interlibrary loans) is not affected by this upgrade and will continue to work normally.

Off-campus Login

The proxy service (http://proxy.library.carleton.ca) that provides off-campus access to e-resources is not affected by this upgrade and continues to work normally.

How do I find the new search tools?

When the new search tools launch, we'll update the Library's web site so that links will go to the new search tools.

In other words, you can just use the Library web site as you normally would, and the new tools will be there for you when you need them!

How do I use the new search tools?

Most of the new search tools work more or less the same way as the tools you already use, so we don't expect they will be too hard to figure out.

However, there will also be information that we'll be adding to the Library web site to help you get the most out of the new tools.

 

 

If you have any questions, please contact Edward Bilodeau.

This post was updated to include the name of the new library search tool, Omni, that was announced on October 30.


October 15, 2019

Omni launch delayed until January

The library is in the process of implementing Omni, a new library services platform that will provide you with new library search tools.

While we are making every effort to not disrupt any of the services offered by the library, there are a few areas where temporary changes to our services are necessary.

These changes will begin to take place on November 15, 2019 until the process is completed.

Holds/Requests updated!

From November 15, 2019 until further notice you will not be able to place a hold or recall books that are on loan to other patrons.

However, any holds placed before that time will remain in effect and will be delivered in the regular time frame.

If the book you need is out on loan, we recommend requesting a copy through interlibrary loan.

Requesting items from storage 

From December 1, 2019 until further notice you will not be able to request items from storage.

Ordering of books and other materials (Nov 1-Jan 2020)

Regular ordering of books and other materials will stop on November 1, 2019 and will resume in January 2020.

Order of materials for course reserves will continue without interruption.

If there is a book you are interested in that is not in our collection, we recommend using interlibrary loan to get a copy.

Fine payments (Dec 1-Jan 2020)

From December 1, 2019 to January, 10 2020 we will not be able to accept payment of library fines.

Electronic resources in the Library Catalogue (ongoing)

As part of the preparation to migrate to the new library services platform, we are gradually removing ebooks, ejournals, and other electronic resources from the Library Catalogue and instead making them available through Summon (i.e. the search on the library's web site).

If you want your searches to reliably include all the e-resources that we have, we recommend using Summon and not the Library Catalogue.

Questions?

If you have any questions, please contact Edward Bilodeau (Head, Library Technology Services).


October 9, 2019

Update : Omni launch delayed

The library will be holding an information session for faculty and instructors on the new library search tools that will be launching on December 10, 2019.

The presentation will cover the following topics:

  • Tour of the new Primo discovery interface
  • Review of changes to other library search tools
  • Impact on library services during implementation

The presentation will be given twice during the week of the fall break:

Session 1 - Tuesday, October 22
1:30 - 2:30
MacOdrum Library, Room 252B

Session 2 - Thursday, October 24
1:30 - 2:30
MacOdrum Library, Room 252B

Space is limited, so please RSVP by emailing Edward Bilodeau. Be sure to specify which session you will be attending.


October 8, 2019

Couldn’t make our NVivo workshops earlier this term? There’s another chance to attend two of our most popular ones:

Design Your Research with NVivo

Mon, Nov 1: 9 to 11 am

Approaches to Coding

Mon, Nov 18: 9 to 11 am 

https://library.carleton.ca/services/tours-and-workshops/nvivo-workshops


September 30, 2019

Want to know more about R? Want to try out the R program? Come to our workshop to get started with R.

Date: Thursday October 3, 2019

Time: 4 to 7 p.m.

Location: ML153 (in the Library)

Seats are limited so first come, first served!


September 30, 2019

Omni launch delayed

Later this semester the library will be launching Omni, a new set of search tools for finding and accessing books, articles, and other materials in our collection.

Omni will be available from the library web site in January, 2020.

Omni will replace the existing search interface, the catalogue, as well as our listing of journals and databases.

Ares (course reserves) and RACER (interlibrary loan) will not be changing as part of this upgrade.

While we are working to minimize the disruption caused by this upgrade, we are expecting that we will need to make a few temporary changes to library services in the weeks leading up to the launch. We'll provide more information on those changes, as well as a more comprehensive overview of all the changes the new system will bring, in our next update.

We are also planning a series of information sessions for faculty during the fall break (October 21-25). Details on those sessions will be made available shortly as well.

This project is part of Collaborative Futures, a new consortium of 14 universities in Ontario that are working together to implement a shared library services platform. The goal of this consortium is to improve services and to facilitate access to collections held in university libraries across the province. To learn more, see Collaborative Futures (Ontario Council of University Libraries).

If you have any questions, please contact Edward Bilodeau.

Note: This post was updated to include the name of the new library search tool, Omni, that was announced on October 30.


September 26, 2019

Professor Mariana Esponda has challenged her architectural conservation students to create a contemporary and compatible addition to Ottawa’s Chateau Laurier. In the midst of the Chateau’s current design controversy, come see the exciting vision of 8 talented Carleton students and how they provide vibrant and differing solutions for a meaningful design applied to one of the city’s most important landmarks. This exhibit runs for the 2019 Fall term on MacOdrum Library’s Gallery Wall, located on the Main Floor across from the Services Desk.


September 26, 2019

A series of beautifully hand cut screen-prints by Carleton’s Brian Burns are the featured exhibit in MacOdrum Library’s Alumni Reading Room. Created to advertise dances at City, University of London in the 1960’s, these dynamic and colourful posters embody a nostalgic view of the London music scene which included bands like The Who and The Beatles.  Additional images of pop culture icons cleverly capture the spirit of the people and the time. The exhibit runs for the 2019 Fall term. Read the latest on this exhibit at https://newsroom.carleton.ca/story/rock-poster-exhibit-brings-back-the-sixties and to learn more visit bb1967.com or brian.burns@carleton.ca.


September 24, 2019

Do you vote?

Please have a look at the new display outside of Research Support Services, main floor past the elevators and to the left.

Student employee Kayla Dodd, who put the display together, has this to say:

"This display highlights library resources on American and Canadian politics, provides some definitions, and showcases the party leaders in Canada whose parties have seats in the House of Commons. Its goal is to get people thinking about politics as the federal election approaches. There are a variety of resources related to political action, apathy, corruption and function, so there should be something for everyone!"


September 12, 2019

This display includes books selected from the Carleton Library collection on the topic of elections, voting, mobilization, and democracy.

Also included is material from the Barry Wilson Collection located in the Archives & Special Collections department. The Barry Wilson Collection contains ephemera of Canadian political memorabilia collected by Barry Wilson during his 30 years working as a journalist for the Western Producer.


September 11, 2019

The new Carleton University Book Arts Lab needs an imprint and we are looking to our community to help us come up with one. We also have $1000 to give to the winning designer. From September 6 to October 4 we’ll be opening this contest to anyone who would like to design a visual representation of what The Book Arts Lab imprint could be.

For each submission we are looking for a name and a draft of a logo (does not need to be print quality) for the Book Arts Lab. Submissions should be emailed to mike.reynolds@carleton.ca and should include your name and your file submission with your sugegsted name and logo.

Read through contest details here before submitting!

If you have any questions, please email them to mike.reynolds@carleton.ca.

What is an imprint?

The name of a press or a publisher, often accompanied by a logo. The name can reflect the purpose of the press, its character, an individual, a place, etc.

Examples

Virago Press - feminist literature (a virago is a woman warrior)

McClelland & Stewart - named after founders

The Kelmscott Press - after William Morris' home

The Oxford University Press - book publisher attached to the university

Golden Cockerel Press - after the animal, they produced fine, well-designed and exquisitely illustrated books through the early-mid 20th century

Union Press - named after the Union Pub, where the three principals failed to agree on any other imprint name


September 11, 2019

Check out the exhibit on the main floor that documents the history of capital Pride from its inception to today.


September 10, 2019

Kanopy is a video streaming service that provides a platform for educational video products covering a wide range of subjects. Because of the unsustainable and unpredictable costs associated with this product, Carleton Library has moved to a fully mediated access model. This means that instead of having the entire catalogue open and films that are viewed becoming automatically purchased, those who want a film through Kanopy will have to make a request. (A form appears when you click on the video). Priority for purchase will be given to faculty and instructors who need the film streamed for teaching purposes.

Carleton Library has a number of other video services, including:

Video streaming is a growing and ever-changing entity and as with all of our subscriptions, we will evaluate to ensure that we are spending collection dollars in a way that is both financially sustainable and that meets the research, teaching, and learning needs of our Carleton community.

For additional questions, contact Laura Newton Miller at laura.newtonmiller@carleton.ca


September 10, 2019

The new Carleton University Book Arts Lab needs an imprint and we are looking to our community to help us come up with one. We also have $1000 to give to the winning designer.

From September 6 to October 4 we’ll be opening this contest to anyone who would like to design a visual representation of what The Book Arts Lab imprint could be.

The winning design will be awarded a cash prize, in the amount of $1000 (CDN).

Read through contest details here before submitting!

If you have any questions, please email them to mike.reynolds@carleton.ca.

What is an imprint?

The name of a press or a publisher, often accompanied by a logo. The name can reflect the purpose of the press, its character, an individual, a place, etc.

How are presses named?

Carefully. Like branding, it is unthinkable to change an imprint once established. The two largest imprints in the world today, namely Hachette and Penguin-Random House are named after, respectively, a hatchet; an ungainly, comical, flightless bird; and a mission to print random titles. Certainly, if created today, none of these imprints would have been chosen. And yet, they survived and still thrive. 

To name a press, one must have an understanding of its purpose, location, associations, specializations or areas of interest, etc. 

What is this Press about?

In the case of this yet-to-be-named press, it will be located in a large glass-walled Book Arts Lab on the main (2nd) floor of MacOdrum Library at Carleton University in Ottawa. (In this description alone, there are half a dozen possible names, including Yet To Be Named Press, along with MacOdrum Press, Fishbowl Press, Second Storey Press, Carleton Press and so on). 

Unlike most other presses, the Book Arts Lab will be equipped with "old school" technology to be used to further academic understanding by providing experiential learning opportunities for students, faculty, staff and the public. The limited output will be posters, broadsides, books and woodcut illustrations printed on vintage presses, hand bound using traditional techniques, incorporating hand-lettered calligraphy and hand-made paper. 

Why is it such a big deal?

It's like naming a boat; it requires some thought. 

Has the name been used? If so, it's best not to confuse bibliographers and reference searches with unnecessary  duplication. It may be historically interesting to call it the Aldine Press, after the famous press of the great renaissance printer Aldus Manutius but that could be seen as pretentious grandiosity. 

Is the name appropriate? Naming it Whatever! Press might be pop-culture current, but does not reflect well the press described above. And it may not age well. 

Examples

  • Virago Press - feminist literature (a virago is a woman warrior)
  • Bloomsbury Press - private press belonging to Virginia Wolf, named after the estate which also lent its name to the group of writers, artists (and economist) who made up the Bloomsbury Group
  • McClelland & Stewart - named after founders
  • The Kelmscott Press - after William Morris' home
  • The Oxford University Press - book publisher attached to the university
  • Golden Cockerel Press - after the animal, they produced fine, well-designed and exquisitely illustrated books through the early-mid 20th century
  • Union Press - named after the Union Pub, where the three principals failed to agree on any other imprint name

About the Book Arts Lab

In its next 100 years, our Chandler and Price press will become the centerpiece of a living book arts laboratory within MacOdrum Library. Teamed with a nineteenth-century iron press and a twentieth-century flatbed press, we will demonstrate document production throughout the course of Canadian history. In addition, we will exhibit the creation of medieval manuscripts to explain how scribes sewed, ruled, wrote, and illuminated books for over a thousand years. We will also display bookbinding tools, early printed books from Carleton’s rare books collection, and even a tool that many students have never used: the typewriter.

This unique initiative has already begun to build community. Plans for the book arts laboratory have been a collaborative effort on the part of alumni, staff, and faculty, and have captured the imagination of professors from Canadian Studies, Communications and Journalism, History, Industrial Design, and especially English, which houses a unique doctoral program in the Production of Literature. Our team has been reaching out to institutions in Ottawa such as the Canada Science and Technology Museum, to the local book arts community, to individual printers and artists, and to other universities with thriving book arts laboratories across North America. Carleton students will have an opportunity for experiential learning in their classes; students and members of the community at large will look on with curiosity through the laboratory’s glass walls; printers and artists from the Ottawa area will enliven the arts on campus and beyond.


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